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Creating Documents in Word 2002


This tutorial will acquaint you with the procedures involved in creating Blank Documents, E-mail Messages, Web Pages and how to create a new document from existing documents or based on the General Templates. For detailed explanation of each of these types of Word documents, see the post, 'Types of Microsoft Word Documents' in this blog. I have decided to stick to using the commands on the Menu bar only in this tutorial. Knowing how to do things using the main menu commands will put you in better command/control of the environment, as well as make using the toolbar buttons and keyboard shortcuts easier to understand and use appropriately.



Create a New Blank Document in Word 2002

By default, when you load Word 2002 (or later), it starts with a new blank document, together with the Task Pane displayed at the right hand side of the workspace, within the window. As it is, you can start creating your document right away.

However, if you have just one document currently running within your Word window, you will find that the window invariably turns Grey immediately you close/quit the active document, but NOT THE WORD WINDOW ITSELF. If you had previously, knowingly or  inadvertently, disabled the Standard toolbar and you are not geeky enough to know how to start another document, in this situation, without using the New Document shortcut button on the Standard toolbar or a keyboard shortcut, you will have no choice but exit Word first and restart it every time before you can create another blank document.

So this section will walk you through the procedures of creating a new blank document in Word 2002 (or later versions) in any circumstance, using a Menu bar command and other alternative methods.
The following graphic displays a typical Word window containing no open document.


The following are the simple steps involved in creating a new blank document in Word 2002/2003:
  1. On the Menu bar, click File. The File menu is pulled down
  2. From the File menu, click New. This displays the New Document Task Pane.
  3. In the New Document task pane, under New, click Blank Document. A new blank document window will immediately appear.






Create a New Document from a Copy of an Existing Document

This option lets you create a new document from an existing document. Using this option, Word creates copy of an existing document  for you. You can then modify the copy and save it with a new name. By default, the file is saved in the same folder as the original, but you can change it if you like. Note that whatever changes you make to this document (the copy), will not reflect on the original.

Steps:
  1. If the New Document task pane is not already displayed, on the File menu, click New.


  2. In the New Document task pane , under New from existing document, click Choose document. The New from Existing Document dialog box is displayed.
  3. Click the document you want to create a new document from. If you want to open a document that was saved in a different folder, locate and open the folder.
  4. Click Create New


  5. Make the desired changes to the document, and save it with a different name.




Create a Blank Web Page
  1. If the New Document task pane is not already displayed on screen, from the File menu, click New.
  2. In the New Document task pane, under New, click Blank Web Page.  The document will be displayed in a Web Page view.
  3. Create and save the document. The created document will be saved in HTML format.

Create a Web Page from an Existing Word Document

In Word, you can easily convert a document into a Web Page document.

Steps:
  1. Make sure the document you want to convert to a web page is already displayed on screen.
  2. On the File menu, click Save as Web Page. This opens the Save As dialog box.
  3. Choose an appropriate location (a drive and a folder) where to save the file.
  4. In the File name box, type a name for the document.
  5. Just above the File name box is a line of text. By default, Word picks a snippet of text from the first sentence of the document and display it here. This will become the text to display as the page title on the title bar of the browser. You can edit this if you like.
  6. To specify an appropriate page title text for the web page, click the Change Title button, enter the desired page title text in the Set Page Title dialog box that appears and click OK.
  7. Click Save.
  • You may now start a browser and preview the document in it.



Create an E-mail Message in Word

If your PC is connected to the internet or an intranet, and you have configured your e-mail client (e.g  Microsoft Outlook or Outlook Express) appropriately, you can easily create and send a document straight from Word in your PC to your friends, relatives, customers, etc. The E-mail Message type of document in Microsoft Word enables you to do this. You can also send the body of an existing document as attachment, alongside an e-mail message.

Steps:
  1. If the New document task pane is not already displayed, on the File menu, click New.
  2. In the New Document task pane, under New, click Blank E-mail Message. A blank E-mail message document window now displays. 
  3. In the To, and Cc boxes on the Envelope toolbar, enter the recipients details (e-mail addresses, or names, if such names together with their respective e-mail addresses already exist in an address book in your PC), separating them with a semi-colon.


    • You can select recipient names from an Address list by clicking on the icons beside To and Cc.
    • In the Subject box, type the subject of the message.
    • Type the message in the message area.
    • To insert a file or an item, click the drop down arrow beside the Insert File button, and select the File, or Item, depending on which you want to attach.
    • Click Send to have the message delivered to the recipients.


    Send an Existing Document as E-Mail Message
     Microsoft Word has made it real easy to forward Word documents from your PC to your contacts. You can send such documents, either as the body of an E-mail message or as an attachment. Note that you must have a working internet connection and a configured e-mail client before such documents can successfully leave your PC and get delivered to the recipients.

    Steps:
    1.      Make sure the document you want to send as e-mail message is already open.
    2.      From the File menu, select Send To…
    3.      On the Send To submenu, click Mail Recipient. The document now opens in an E-mail Message window, with the content of the current document loaded in the message area as the body of the message.
    4.      In the To, and Cc boxes on the Envelope toolbar, enter the recipients details (e-mail addresses, or names, if such names together with their respective e-mail addresses already exist in an address book in your PC), separating them with a semi-colon.
    •         You can select recipient names from an Address list by clicking on the icons beside To or Cc boxes.
    5.      In the Subject box, type the subject of the message.
    6.      The message area already displays the document as the body of the message. If necessary, edit it or simply add a postscript (P.S) text.
    7.      Click Send to send the message


    TIP:         
    •    To send the current document as an e-mail message, you can skip steps 2 and 3 above and simply click the E-mail button on the Standard toolbar. 
    •    If you only want to attach the current/existing document to an e-mail message, whereby you have a separate message in the message area of the e-mail message, choose Mail Recipient (as Attachment)…, from the Send To submenu inside the File menu.



    Create a New Document from General Templates
    Microsoft Word comes with a huge collection of document templates that you can base a document on. An important benefit of the inbuilt Word document templates is that they enable you to easily create a document of professional standard. Believe me, Word document templates can help save the day for you some day, it can even help save your job! (See the scenario under the heading, 'General Templates'.) With such templates offering you professional guide, you can easily create a document you are currently not quite familiar with.

    Steps:
    1. If the New Document task pane is not already displayed on screen, on the File menu, click New.
    2. In the New Document task pane, under New from template, click General Templates. The General Templates dialog box is opened. See below.
    3. Click the tab that best describes the kind of document you want to create.
    4. Double-click the icon for the document template or wizard you want to use.
    5. A document based on the selected template opens, giving you placeholders into which you can insert specific document elements. Now you can create a document based on this template. Click in each placeholder and insert the appropriate item.
    6. Type the body text of the document in the appropriate section.
    7. Save the document.

    TIP:
      • If you have recently used a template or wizard, it will appear under New from template, where you can just click to open it.
      • You can also create your own templates to store styles, AutoText entries, macros, and text that you plan to reuse often.






    Types of Microsoft Word Documents

    You can create many kinds of documents in Word, from or using any of the following new document options:

    • Blank Document
    • Blank Web Page
    • Blank E-mail Message
    • General Templates
    • Existing Document
    The choice or decision about which of these options you should use in creating your document would depend on, but not limited to, the following:
    • Your purpose for creating the document;
    • Destination of output or what you intend doing with the output.
    So you want to create a new document in Word? What for? Who is going to use it? Where, and in which form? What would be its fate, scope of audience and life span?

    Considering and providing cogent answers to the  questions above will enable you make a right choice while considering which kind of Word document to create or which option must be appropriate to use.

    For a document you want to create, its purpose or what you intend doing with it can be any of the following:
    • I simply want to create the document, and print it out to have a hard copy of it for private or formal use. ( Would you like to attach the document to an e-mail message or you want to send it as the body of an E-mail message?)
    • I want to create and send the content of the document electronically, from my computer to other computers, via e-mail addresses.
    • I want to publish the document to the internet (or an intranet) so that many people can have access to it from anywhere, anytime.
    • I'm not really familiar with this kind of document I want to, or I'm asked to create and don't really know how to go about creating it.
    • I want to create a document format that will be available to assist me (or others users) later in creating a new document, based on this format.
    • I want to create a new document from a document previously created and saved in my computer or network.
    Well, whichever is true in your case, the following sections will assist you in deciding which among the document options listed above will be most appropriate, or guide you in creating your new document.


    Blank Document
    As the name aptly implies, a Blank Document opens a blank document page where you can create your document from scratch. You do all the typing, editing and formatting without the software offering you any suggestions, directions or guidelines regarding what to type, where to type it, or the best structure for the document.

    Start with a new document when you want to create a traditional printed document, e.g. Time Table, handout, letter, curriculum vitae (CV), etc.

    You should also start with a Blank Document if you wish to send the document content to a mail recipient as attachment.

    TIP: Blank Document is most appropriate for the first statement above.


    Blank Web Page

    This offers a blank page in Web Layout View where you can create a web document from scratch. Use a Blank Web Page if you intend to display the content of the document on an intranet, or on the internet in a web browser. Web documents are automatically saved in HyperText Markup Language (HTML) format.

    TIP: Blank Web Page is most appropriate for the third statement above.


    Blank E-mail Message
    An E-mail Message is a document you create and send directly from Word to other people in different locations. Use an E-mail Message if you want to compose and send a message or a document to others directly from Word.

    An E-mail message includes an e-mail Envelope toolbar in which you can enter the recipient's Name (or e-mail address if you have not previously stored the address with the names in an Address or Contact list in your computer or network) and the Subject of the message; set message properties and Send it.

    TIP:  Blank E-mail Message is most appropriate for the second statement above.




    General Templates
    To explain this kind of option for creating a Word document, let's quickly consider a scenario below:

    Imagine a scenario wherein you recently secured a job as the Secretary to the Director of a large private firm that is constantly in correspondence with both domestic and foreign enterprises. Sadly, for three days now, your boss has been inordinately displeased with your performance and is no longer confident with your suitability for the office, because he now suspects you don't appear to be proficient in word processing (who knows, probably his new girl friend who is a computer whiz-kid is already pestering him to take over your office). Then, this fateful afternoon, your paranoid boss just storms into your cubicle, seriously exasperated over your last work, and threatens to dismiss you if again you ever make such simple mistakes in the content, layout, structure, and tone of the letters or any other official document he asks you to create for him (the company, to be precise).


    So, as the last chance to prove your skills, he hurriedly dictates a note and asks you to use it to create a professional fax (which you have never created before) to be forwarded to a customer in London; and then another note which you must use in a contemporary memo ( you don't even know how this one looks like), notifying all the company's employees of an urgent meeting which is to hold the following day. He gives you only thirty (30) minutes to submit the printed documents to his table.

    In this situation, what would you do. Would you tell him you don't know how these documents look like or how to create them? If you do that, boy, I bet you, your boss will gladly relieve you of your well-paid job and replace you with, maybe, his girlfriend

    But what would you do to impress you boss and to make him retain you. The simple answer is ,"you have nothing to worry about". Why? because, the General templates in Word are all there to guide you".

    Use a template when you want to create a new document based on a ready-made format. The General Templates dialog  box offers different kind of documents and wizards to assist you in creating a new document based on ready-made formats and structure.

    TIP: General Templates provides solution to the    fourth and fifth statements above.


    Existing Document
    This allows you to create a new document from a copy of a document that has been previously created and saved in your PC or network.

    Using the Existing Document option makes it possible for you to create a new document from a copy of an existing document which you can modify and then save with a new name or in a new location. In this case, whatever changes you make to the document will be affecting the copy of the document only, while the original copy remains intact. 












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    Getting Started with Word 2002


    In Windows, there are several ways you can start Word and get it running within seconds. Although it is common knowledge to start programs in Windows via the conventional Start button, I think it really wouldn't be bad at all to know other nerdy methods of starting programs (like Word) in Windows.

    You can start Word 2002 via any of the following methods:
    • Start button and the Start menu
    • Using the Run command
    • Shortcut icon on the desktop
    • Automatically after starting Windows
    • Together with a Word document
    Starting Word Using the Start Button and the Start Menu
    Use the following procedures to start Word using the Windows Start button and the Start menu:
    1. Click the Start button. The Start menu will appear.
    2. Move the mouse pointer over the (All) Programs item in the menu. The programs menu will appear.
    3. Move the pointer over the Microsoft Word item and click.  
    Word will start in a new blank document window as follows:




    For a detailed explanation/description of the Word XP 2002 window and its elements, click here. In the meantime, let's quickly walk through the other methods of starting Word in Windows.

    Starting Word Using  Run Command
    To do this,
    1. Click the Start button, to display the Start menu.
    2. On the Start menu, click Run.
    3. Type 'winword.exe' in the text box within the Run dialog box that appears (ignore quotations marks).

    Word will start immediately in a new blank document.


    Starting Word Using Word Shortcut Icon on the Desktop

    You can also start Word straight and more quickly via a Word shortcut icon on the desktop.
    If you do not already have the Word shortcut icon on the desktop of your PC, and you'd like to speed up starting Word by using this method, follow the procedures below to add the shortcut icon to the desktop of your PC, and with it start Word more quickly any time you want.

    To add the Word shortcut icon to the desktop
    1. Click the Start button.
    2. Point to (All) Programs.
    3. On the programs menu, right-click the Microsoft Word item.
    4. On the shortcut/context menu that appears, select 'Send To', and then choose 'Desktop (create shortcut)'.
    The Microsoft Word shortcut icon will be added to the desktop.
    • To start Word at any time, simply double-click the Word shortcut icon on the desktop and Word will start in all its glory!

    Starting Word Automatically after Starting Windows

    Customarily, you no doubt must have been starting Word by simply clicking the Start button on the Windows Task bar and choosing Programs and then Microsoft Word.

    If you cannot but use Word every time you boot your PC, it means that you invariably go over the same task of manually starting Word after every reboot of your PC. This can sometimes be time-consuming, boring and frustrating, you know.


    Well, in this section, I will teach you how to make Word start automatically after loading Windows.


    You should/must have known that Windows is an operating system, and so, controls the automatic starting of programs, not the programs themselves starting automatically. This means that every program that starts automatically every time you boot/reboot your PC does not do so on its own, but is being started automatically by your PC's operating system (Windows, for example).


    Windows places all programs and documents to be loaded, automatically, in a special folder called StartUp

    So, if you want to speed up your work by making Word (or any other program) start automatically after  starting Windows, you need to move the Word program file or shortcut into the StartUp folder.

    Steps:
    1. Click the Start button and select (All) Programs.
    2. On the Programs menu, move the mouse pointer over the Microsoft Word item, right-click and then choose Copy.
    3. To reach the StartUp folder, enter this path on the address bar of the Windows Explorer 'C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator\Start Menu\Programs\Startup'. 
      Please ignore the quotation marks and, if necessary, replace the drive letter, 'C' with the appropriate drive letter of the hard drive or partition where you installed Word. If necessary also, replace 'Administrator' with the appropriate UserName you have on your PC.
    4. On getting to the StartUp folder, paste the Word program icon you copied in step 2 above.
    That's all you need to do to make Word, or any program, start automatically after starting Windows.
    In future, Word will start automatically and immediately Windows is loaded.

    TIP:
    1. Any time you no longer want Word to start automatically this way, simply do one of the following:
    •   Go back to the Startup folder and delete the Word shortcut icon from it.
    •   Click the Start button, point to Programs, select the Startup item, and in the Startup sub-menu, click and drag the Word program icon out of it.
       2.  If you find step 3 above difficult to apply, you may consider the following alternative steps: 

      To start a program each time you start Windows
      1. Right-click the Start button, and then click Properties.
      2. On the Start Menu tab, click Classic Start menu, and then click Customize. This changes the style of the Start menu.
      3. Click Advanced.
      4. In the Start Menu folder, find the shortcut to Word ( or the program you want to start each time you start Windows), and paste or hold down the Ctrl key and drag it to the Startup folder located in the Programs folder.
      5. You can get to the StartUp folder by following the hierarchy below on the left hand side of the Windows Explorer.








      Start Word together with a Word Document

      Another way you can load Word is by starting it and opening a document simultaneously.
      Steps:
      1. Locate the folder where the Word document you want to open is saved.
      2. Double-click the Word file or right-click it and choose Open from the shortcut menu that appears.
      Word will now start and open the document together with it.


      Microsoft Word Toolbars, ScreenTips and Toolbar Buttons

      The ToolbarA toolbar is a bar containing buttons and options that you use to carry out commands. With toolbars, commands become just handy and easily accessible to users. The buttons contained in them are used to access commands more quickly than by opening the menus and the respective dialog boxes.

      ScreenTips
      I mentioned earlier that toolbars contain smart icons serving as shortcuts to the main menu commands. However, these toolbars offer too many buttons of various looks and shapes for a user to easily remember their names or their functions. You might well ask: 'What is the use of a toolbar button if its name or function is not known?' Well, the ever-creative programmers at Microsoft also once contemplated this problem. So they fashioned a tool known as ScreenTip. ScreenTips, also known as Tooltips, are little pop-up descriptions that appear when you rest the mouse pointer over a toolbar button. They appear on the screen to provide certain information about a toolbar button, tracked change, or comment or to display a footnote or endnote.

      So, any time you are at a loss as to the name or use of a toolbar button, simply rest the mouse pointer over such button and immediately, you'll see a little text pop-up below the pointer, saying something. This is a ScreenTip or ToolTip.

      In case the ScreenTips don't appear when you move the pointer over a button, it is possible the feature has been disabled/turned off. You can turn it on by doing the following:
      1. On the Tools menu, click Options and then click the View tab.
      2. Under Show, select the ScreenTips check box.
      That's all. Those are the steps you'll also take to deactivate the feature, for one reason or another, though not advisable.

      HOW TO DISPLAY/INVOKE A (MISSING) TOOLBAR
      Suppose a toolbar you need very much to hasten your work (e.g., the Formatting Toolbar) is not currently visible on screen, what would you do to invoke such 'missing' or 'hiding' toolbar from its hiding place? Well, anytime you face a situation like this, simply use any of the following methods to bail yourself out.


      Displaying A Toolbar Using the View Menu
      1. On the Menu bar, click View. This displays the View menu.
      2. Then, on the View menu, point to Toolbars item.
      3. This now displays the Toolbars sub-menu, in which the names of certain toolbars are shown. Here, you'll find that some of the toolbar names have a check mark to the left of them, while some have none. The check mark indicates the toolbar bearing it is already displayed on screen.
      4. Select and click the name of the desired toolbar from the Toolbars sub-menu.The toolbar you selected will then appear on screen.
      Fig: Showing or hiding a toolbar using the View menu

      Those are the steps you'll also follow to hide a toolbar you no longer want on screen at a particular moment.

        NOTE:
        If you can't find the particular toolbar you are really looking for on the Toolbars sub-menu, click Customize, and then click the Toolbars tab in the Customize dialog box that appears. In the Toolbars list, click the checkbox next to the name of the toolbar you want and then click Close. See figure below.
        Fig: Showing or hiding a toolbar using the Customize dialog box

        To Display a Desired Toolbar Using a Shortcut
        Simply right-click an empty space on any toolbar, and then click the name of toolbar you want.

        TIPIf you do not see the toolbar you're looking for on the  shortcut menu, click the Toolbar Options arrow, point to Add or Remove Buttons, click Customize, click the Toolbars tab in the Customize dialog box, and then, in the toolbars list, click the checkbox next to the toolbar you want and click Close when you are through.
        Fig: Displaying the Customize dialog box via the Toolbar Options button


        At this juncture, I'm quite confident to a reasonable extent that how to determine the name of any toolbar button/icon should never be a problem to you, since the ScreenTips are there to "tell-tale". Right now, your problem, I guess, should be: "What exactly is the function of each of these toolbar buttons/icons?" Well, if you have asked that question, it simply shows you are bright and ready to learn. The good news is, you are not helpless: I have dedicated the following sections to expatiate a little on the Standard toolbar, Formatting toolbar, and the Drawing toolbar, since you will be using them constantly.


        Standard Toolbar
        You have learned that the Standard toolbar is, by default, docked directly below the Menu bar, and that it contains buttons used for performing tasks similar to the commands available in the Menu bar. Let's now take a moment to identify the name and purpose/use of each of the buttons on the Standard toolbar.


        NAME

        ICON

        USE
        New
        Creates a new blank document based on the
        default or current template.
        Open
        Opens a document previously created and saved in
        Word.
        Save
        Saves new changes to the current document or
        file, with its filename, location and document format.
        E-mail
        Sends the content of the current document as the
        body of an E-mail message.
        Search
        Finds files, Web pages and Outlook items based
        on the search criteria you enter.
        Print
        Prints the active document or selection.
        Print Preview
        Shows how a document or file will look when you
        print it.
        Spelling
        Checks spelling in the active document, file or
        item.
        Cut
        Removes the selected item from the active
        document and places it in the Clipboard.
        Copy
        Copies selected text or object to the Clipboard.
        Paste
        Pastes the item you cut or copied into (the
        position of the insertion point) the document from the Clipboard.
        Format Painter
        Copies the format from a selected text or object
        and applies it to the text or object you click.
        Undo
        Reverses the last action or deletes the last
        entry you typed. Click the arrow next to this icon to select and reverse
        multiple actions at a time.
        Redo
        Reverses the action of the last Undo command.
        Click the arrow next to this icon to select and reverse multiple Undo
        command actions.
        Insert Hyperlink
        Inserts a new hyperlink or edits the selected
        hyperlink.
        Tables and Borders
        Displays Tables and Borders toolbar, which
        offers tools for editing/formatting a table and its content.
        Insert Table
        Inserts a table in the document. Click and drag
        to specify the number of rows and columns.
        Insert Microsoft Excel
        Worksheet
        Inserts a new Microsoft Excel worksheet at the
        insertion point. Click and drag to specify the number of rows and columns.
        Use the Excel tools on the toolbar to edit the table.
        Columns
        Changes the number of columns in a document or a
        section of a document.
        Drawing
        Shows or hides the Drawing toolbar.
        Document Map
        Used to turn on or off the Document Map.
        Document Map shows the outline structure of a document so that you can
        quickly navigate through the document and keep track of your location in it.
        Zoom
        Used to "zoom in" to get a close-up view of a
        document or "zoom out" to see more of the page at a reduced size.
        Show/Hide
        Shows or hides non-printing characters, such as
        tab characters, paragraph marks and hidden text.
        Office Assistant
        (Microsoft Office Help)
        Opens Help or invokes the Office Assistant to
        provide help topics and tips to help you accomplish your task.



        Formatting Toolbar
        The Formatting toolbar offers shortcut buttons to help format a document quickly. From the Formatting toolbar, you can quickly apply formatting attributes such as Font; Font Color; Alignment; Line Spacing; Bullets and Numbering, etc, document text, to save time.

        The following table provides a list of Formatting toolbar buttons and a brief description of each.


        NAME

        ICON

        USE
        Style
        Opens a Style drop-down list from which you can
        select one.
        Font
        Changes the font of the selected text or number.
        Click the drop-down arrow beside the box and select a font from the list.
        Font Size
        Changes the size of the selected text or number.
        Enter a size value in the box, or select an appropriate size from the
        drop-down list.
        Bold
        Applies or removes bold formatting to or from a
        selected text or number.
        Italic
        Makes selected text or number italic, but
        removes italic from selected text or number if it's already italic.
        Underline
        Underlines (rules a line)  or removes
        underline formatting from selected text or number.
        Align Left
        Aligns the selected text, number or inline
        object to the left with a jagged edge.
        Center
        Aligns selected text, numbers or inline objects
        to the center.
        Align Right
        Aligns the selected text, number or inline
        objects to the right, with a jagged edge.
        Justify
        Aligns the selected paragraphs to both the left
        and right margins or indents.
        Numbering
        Adds numbers to or removes numbers numbers from
        selected paragraphs.
        Bullets
        Adds bullets to or removes bullets from the
        selected paragraphs.
        Decrease Indent
        Indents the selected paragraph to the previous
        tab stop or indents the content of the selected item to the left by one
        character width of the standard font.
        Increase Indent
        Indents the selected paragraph to the next tab
        stop or indents the content of the selected item to the right by one
        character width of the standard font.
        Outside Border
        Adds or removes a border around the selected
        text, paragraphs, cells, pictures or other objects.
        Highlight
        Marks text so that it is highlighted and stands
        out from the surrounding text.
        Font Color
        Formats the selected text with the color you
        click


        Drawing Toolbar
        The Drawing toolbar is located at the bottom of the window, between the Horizontal Scroll bar and the Status bar. Like every other toolbar, this also contains smart icons representing shortcuts to Main menu commands in Word.

        It holds buttons/tools used in creating drwaings, such as rectangles, ovals, lines, arrows, WordArt text, etc. It also offers tools for inserting organizational charts and ready-made pictures and Clip Arts from their different locations.

        Also included in this toolbar are tools for formatting inserted objects and for adding special effects such as shadow or 3-D to lines, rectangles, ovals, etc. Like every other toolbar also, the Drawing toolbar can be displayed or hidden.

        The following table shows a list of tools offered on the Drawing toolbar, and their functions:


        NAME

        ICON

        USE
        Draw
        Offers a number of options for defining the
        relative positions, arrangements, rotation, etc, of drawings in a document.
        It also offers tools for changing the shape of AutoShapes.
        Select Objects
        Changes the pointer to a selection arrow so you
        can click to select objects in the active window.
        AutoShapes
        Offers a group of ready-made shapes that include
        basic shapes, such as rectangles and circles, including a variety of lines
        and connectors, block arrows, flowchart symbols, stars and banners, and
        callouts.
        Line
        Allows you to draw a straight line where you
        click or drag in the active window.
        Arrow
        Draws or inserts a line with an arrow head where
        you click or drag in the active window.
        Rectangle
        Draws a rectangle where you click and drag on
        the active window. You can also draw a square using this tool by holding
        SHIFT while you drag.
        Oval
        Draws an oval where you click and drag in the
        active document. To draw a (perfect) circle, hold down SHIFT while you drag.
        Text Box
        Draws a text box with horizontal direction where
        you click and drag in the active document.
        Insert WordArt
        Creates decorative text by inserting a Microsoft
        Office drawing objects.
        Insert Diagram
        Creates an organizational chart or a circle,
        radial, pyramid, or Venn or target diagram in your document.
        Clip Art
        Opens the Clip Gallery where you can select the
        clip art image you want to insert in your document or update your clip art
        collection.
        Insert Picture
        Inserts an existing picture in your  active
        document at the insertion point.
        Fill Color
        Adds, modifies, or removes the fill color or
        effects from the selected object.
        Line Color
        Adds, modifies, or removes the line color from
        the selected object.
        Font Color
        Allows you to add, modify, or remove the text
        color of the selected text.
        Line Style
        Used to select a thickness for the selected
        line.
        Dash Style
        Allows you to control the appearance of the
        selected line.
        Arrow Style
        Allows you to select the style of arrowhead.
        Shadow Style
        Allows you to select the shadow appearance of
        the selected drawing object.
        3-D Style
        Allows you to add depth to drawing objects such
        as lines, AutoShapes, and freeform objects.















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